Tina Kister

Tina Kister

Information Developer, Consultant, Nanatoo Communications

Tina M. Kister specializes in taking an interdisciplinary approach to improving information-development processes. Kister has more than 20 years of experience in a range of fields that include the sciences, healthcare, software, instructional design, process improvement, project management, Department of Defense, Department of the Interior, fine art, advertising, journalism, and more. With a degree in Communications, graduate studies in Online Communications, and certifications in technical communication (CPTC), project management (PMP), proposal management (APMP), and content strategy, Kister provides a rare perspective that synthesizes best practices across traditionally siloed areas of business communications.

The Science Behind Good Page Design

Auditorium

Good page design is an essential component of effective information development. It ensures that information is easy to find, read, understand, and remember. It can elicit an immediate and positive visceral response, which also facilitates effective communication. While there is no rote recipe for good page design, it is a discipline that can be achieved by applying fairly simple guidelines based on an understanding of the science of human visual perception.

This presentation explores the scientific phenomena related to visual perception and how these phenomena form the foundation of best practices in page design. We look at how sensation processes (in the eye) provide the foundation for basic design elements, and how translation processes (in the brain) provide the foundation for basic design principles. We briefly examine the physiology of human attention and then combine basic design elements and principles using simple math and logic to create documents that are both useful and visually appealing.

Three Takeaways

  • Sensation processes (in the eye) provide the foundation for basic design elements.
  • Translation processes (in the brain) provide the foundation for basic design principles.
  • Design elements and principles can be combined to direct a user’s attention and create information that is easy to find, read, understand, and remember.
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